What’s Your Government 2.0 Personality Type?

May 27, 2009

Government 2.0

Over the last few years between starting the social media practice at Booz Allen and getting involved with the broader Government 2.0 community, I’ve had the opportunity to meet a ton of different people, all with different motivations, frustrations, and aspirations.  While sitting through seemingly endless hours on my flight back from Hawaii, I got to thinking about these different Government 2.0 personalities, and attempted to categorize them here below.

Edgerider – You are always looking for the latest and the greatest Internet meme, idea, and initiative.  You’re an early-adopter of all things technology and were at the forefront of the email, Internet, and personal computer waves.  You own an iPhone and either already have, or are eagerly anticipating buying a new Netbook.  You’re a big Government 2.0 champion now, but will move on to some other shiny new thing when the Government 2.0 meme inevitably bores you.

Innovator – You’re a tinkerer who can’t stand seeing an opportunity go to waste.  You’re a workaholic not because you love your job, but because you see a small chance to make a difference and you always take that chance – the problem is that you have trouble letting opportunities pass by.  You tend to suffer from both FOMO and HOLI.  You may not have been the first one in your office who recognized the potential of Government 2.0, but you were the first one to actually do something about it.

Rockstar – You are the loudest voice in the room.  You’re the one who happily volunteers to give the Government 2.0 briefing.  You’re the first one to raise your hand and challenge the person who’s speaking at a conference.  You’re loud and you’re confident, but more importantly, you’re incredibly knowledgeable.  However, you are also a little ADD – you tend to get involved with a LOT of different initiatives without diving too deep into any particular one.

Risk-taker – You thrive on pushing the envelope and rocking the boat.  The status quo is boring to you, and as such, you’re always looking for opportunities to make things better.  You’ve most likely been in your current position for more than a year and have built up a certain amount of trust among your colleagues.  You think getting reprimanded for something at work is just part of the job and not necessarily a bad thing.  Your Government 2.0 involvement is predicated on you “being the change” whether you should be or not.  You’re still learning that change isn’t always the right answer.

Salesman – Rather than jumping right into the Government 2.0 movement, you bided your time and did a lot of reading and thinking.  You are deliberate and entrepreneurial and have developed a piece of software, a platform, or a website that is meant to help the government, but is ultimately meant to make you or your organization money.  You would do well to shift more of your energy away from selling your product and instead focus more on providing value to the community.

Realist – You’ve been there, done that.  You’re more than likely older than most of the other Government 2.0 people out there.  You understand the challenges that the government is facing, and you recognize that Government 2.0 isn’t going to happen overnight.  While this realism is needed, it also gets you labeled as too conservative and pessimistic.  You don’t get too excited, nor do you get too down – you’re the steady hand that is more than likely managing a Risk-taker or an Innovator.

Laborer – You are the “do-er.”  You’re the foot soldier who’s drafting the social media policies, who’s gardening the internal wiki, and who’s developing the briefings, talking points, and speeches for the Rockstars.  You aren’t interested in being a member of the Goverati and would rather blend into the background.  You are probably well-respected for the Government 2.0 work that you do, but not many people know about it.  While arguably the most important group of people behind Government 2.0, you receive little to no fanfare.

Skeptic – “Why the hell are you spending so much time on Twitter and Facebook when you could be doing real work?”  You don’t see the real business value to social media, and would prefer that your staff stick to the mission-related activities.  You’re conservative and would rather just do your job and go home.  You don’t like change, and you’re probably the one who’s pushing to see metrics and ROI of social media.  You’re not necessarily opposed to social media, but you just don’t see the value yet.  Because of this, you’ve become an adversary to the Risk-takers, Innovators, and Rockstars, but you could offer real value in a Devil’s Advocate-type of role.

Thinker – You’re not on Twitter, nor do you maintain a blog.  However, you ask a ton of questions and do a lot of reading about social media and Government 2.0.  You look up to the Rockstars and the Innovators, but your conservative and private nature keep you from putting yourself “out there.”  You see the value of Government 2.0, but prefer to deal in the theoretical, rather than actually doing it.  You have a job totally unrelated to social media, but want to be involved, as long as it’s on the periphery.

Techie – You’re an IT developer, web programmer, enterprise architect – some sort of IT guy/girl.  You’re an avid World of Warcraft player, and have been using forums and online bulletin boards for more than a decade.  You know the difference between UNIX and Linux, and easily get frustrated when people ask for your help with their computer.  You’re responsible for actually creating the software, platforms, and websites that the Rockstars use, that the Innovators dream up, that the Salesman plugs, and that the Skeptic told you was a waste of time.  You wish you had more say in the strategic development of Government 2.0, but aren’t sure how to get involved at that level.

Opportunist – You got involved with Government 2.0 because you saw an opportunity to make money, enhance your career, or build your business.  That’s your first and primary goal – if you do something good for the government too, that’s great, but if you do something good for you, that’s even better.  Your motivation is on using Government 2.0, not in being a part of Government 2.0.  You are probably one of the most active and vocal people in your organization and in the Government 2.0 community, but because of your motivations, you also present some of the biggest risks.  You and the Skeptic do NOT get along.

Bystander – You have no interest in Government 2.0 or social media.  You’re happy coming to work, doing your job, and going home.  You value your work/life balance, and aren’t interested in anything that infringes on that.  You’re not opposed to Government 2.0 – you might even see the value in it at a holistic level – you’re just not interested in getting involved.

The following personality types were suggested by some of the Rockstars, Innovators, Edgeriders, etc. found in the Comments section.

Networker – You believe in information sharing and connecting people to one another.  You are the government version of Gladwell’s Connector.   Networkers have extended contact lists and actively share information — often through listservs, email, and presentations, oftentimes not even realizing that you’re living Government 2.0.  While probably less tech-savvy than the others on this list, you see the potential of Gov 2.0 and dream of the time when everyone will be a Networker without even trying.

Ambassador – You’re a Rockstar at the core, but you realize that one of the tenets of Government 2.0 requires flexibility.  Ambassadors do whatever it takes to advance the cause, whether that means talking code with a Techie debating the merits of social media with a skeptic or trying to get your Edgerider friend to slow down long enough to give the Laborer time to put something in place.  Depending on who you’re talking to, you can fill all, or none, of these roles.

What’s your Government 2.0 personality?  Would you categorize yourself as one of the above or would you create another category?

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About sradick

I'm Vice President, Director of Public Relations at Brunner in Pittsburgh. Find out more about me here (http://steveradick.com/about/).

View all posts by sradick
  • Steve, I found this to be a really thoughtful (and thought-provoking) post.

    If we’re honest, I think most of us who have either “evangelized” Social Media within an organization…and/or served in functional roles on project teams making these initiatives a reality, have probably seen elements of many of these personality types in our clients, other vendors…and even ourselves. Which ones? Well, that depends on the individual stakeholders, the customer’s/agency’s organizational mindset, the particular project’s scope and requirements, and its unique give-and-take on any given day, as you can certainly attest.

    As I read through these, I admit I had some good, clean fun visualizing avatars (er, faces) of folks I’ve worked with who, to me, (in my totally subjective, and only partially-informed opinion) exemplify each personality type, including the last two.

    I also thought your observation about the tension between the social media “skeptic” and the “opportunist” (called the "carpetbagger" by Geoff Livingston) was particularly insightful. I’d also suggest that this tension is both natural and healthy. Whatever the skeptic’s level of knowledge or motives, you can be certain the opportunist knows that s/he will be be challenging him/her at every turn. I’m absolutely OK with that, so long as their skepticism is based on real, substantive issues (accountability, approach, security, ROI, etc.), rather than just adversarial “devil’s advocacy” for its own sake.

    We’ll always have the opportunists among us (including some large vendors with newly-discovered social media competencies), but at least the skeptics will make ’em sing for their supper.

  • Steve, I found this to be a really thoughtful (and thought-provoking) post.

    If we’re honest, I think most of us who have either “evangelized” Social Media within an organization…and/or served in functional roles on project teams making these initiatives a reality, have probably seen elements of many of these personality types in our clients, other vendors…and even ourselves. Which ones? Well, that depends on the individual stakeholders, the customer’s/agency’s organizational mindset, the particular project’s scope and requirements, and its unique give-and-take on any given day, as you can certainly attest.

    As I read through these, I admit I had some good, clean fun visualizing avatars (er, faces) of folks I’ve worked with who, to me, (in my totally subjective, and only partially-informed opinion) exemplify each personality type, including the last two.

    I also thought your observation about the tension between the social media “skeptic” and the “opportunist” (called the "carpetbagger" by Geoff Livingston) was particularly insightful. I’d also suggest that this tension is both natural and healthy. Whatever the skeptic’s level of knowledge or motives, you can be certain the opportunist knows that s/he will be be challenging him/her at every turn. I’m absolutely OK with that, so long as their skepticism is based on real, substantive issues (accountability, approach, security, ROI, etc.), rather than just adversarial “devil’s advocacy” for its own sake.

    We’ll always have the opportunists among us (including some large vendors with newly-discovered social media competencies), but at least the skeptics will make ’em sing for their supper.

  • Steve, I found this to be a really thoughtful (and thought-provoking) post.

    If we’re honest, I think most of us who have either “evangelized” Social Media within an organization…and/or served in functional roles on project teams making these initiatives a reality, have probably seen elements of many of these personality types in our clients, other vendors…and even ourselves. Which ones? Well, that depends on the individual stakeholders, the customer’s/agency’s organizational mindset, the particular project’s scope and requirements, and its unique give-and-take on any given day, as you can certainly attest.

    As I read through these, I admit I had some good, clean fun visualizing avatars (er, faces) of folks I’ve worked with who, to me, (in my totally subjective, and only partially-informed opinion) exemplify each personality type, including the last two.

    I also thought your observation about the tension between the social media “skeptic” and the “opportunist” (called the "carpetbagger" by Geoff Livingston) was particularly insightful. I’d also suggest that this tension is both natural and healthy. Whatever the skeptic’s level of knowledge or motives, you can be certain the opportunist knows that s/he will be be challenging him/her at every turn. I’m absolutely OK with that, so long as their skepticism is based on real, substantive issues (accountability, approach, security, ROI, etc.), rather than just adversarial “devil’s advocacy” for its own sake.

    We’ll always have the opportunists among us (including some large vendors with newly-discovered social media competencies), but at least the skeptics will make ’em sing for their supper.

  • chance

    I’m somewhere between an innovator and a realist. On the one hand I do like trying out many of these tools, and seeing how they apply to my workplace. On the other hand, if I don’t see an angle that I think works for us, I have little to no patience for it (twitter).

  • chance

    I’m somewhere between an innovator and a realist. On the one hand I do like trying out many of these tools, and seeing how they apply to my workplace. On the other hand, if I don’t see an angle that I think works for us, I have little to no patience for it (twitter).

  • chance

    I’m somewhere between an innovator and a realist. On the one hand I do like trying out many of these tools, and seeing how they apply to my workplace. On the other hand, if I don’t see an angle that I think works for us, I have little to no patience for it (twitter).

  • Tough question. I have traits that are covered by more than one category, but I’m definitely *not* a bystander or a skeptic. And while I am (I think) older than the majority of the Gov 2.0 crowd, and I do realize the challenges we face, I prefer to think of myself not as a realist, but an optimist. Of the other categories, none of them quite covers me, so can I create a new one?

    Evangelist/Cheerleader – You’re the person who is totally on board with Government 2.0 so you want everybody you work with to understand why it’s also good for them. You are constantly sharing links to briefings, blogs, and articles in an effort to pique somebody’s interest. Even though it’s not really your job, you are known throughout your organization for your Government 2.0 obsession (which you call passion). When somebody in your organization has a Government 2.0 question, they are invariably pointed in your direction.

  • Tough question. I have traits that are covered by more than one category, but I’m definitely *not* a bystander or a skeptic. And while I am (I think) older than the majority of the Gov 2.0 crowd, and I do realize the challenges we face, I prefer to think of myself not as a realist, but an optimist. Of the other categories, none of them quite covers me, so can I create a new one?

    Evangelist/Cheerleader – You’re the person who is totally on board with Government 2.0 so you want everybody you work with to understand why it’s also good for them. You are constantly sharing links to briefings, blogs, and articles in an effort to pique somebody’s interest. Even though it’s not really your job, you are known throughout your organization for your Government 2.0 obsession (which you call passion). When somebody in your organization has a Government 2.0 question, they are invariably pointed in your direction.

  • Tough question. I have traits that are covered by more than one category, but I’m definitely *not* a bystander or a skeptic. And while I am (I think) older than the majority of the Gov 2.0 crowd, and I do realize the challenges we face, I prefer to think of myself not as a realist, but an optimist. Of the other categories, none of them quite covers me, so can I create a new one?

    Evangelist/Cheerleader – You’re the person who is totally on board with Government 2.0 so you want everybody you work with to understand why it’s also good for them. You are constantly sharing links to briefings, blogs, and articles in an effort to pique somebody’s interest. Even though it’s not really your job, you are known throughout your organization for your Government 2.0 obsession (which you call passion). When somebody in your organization has a Government 2.0 question, they are invariably pointed in your direction.

  • I like your breakout, Steve. I can see this turning into a “what’s your social media horoscope sign?” meme.

    I find that as with all things personality-related, I fall into several categories, to differing degrees. I’m probably mostly a Laborer, with a heavy dose of Realist, part Salesman, and part Innovator. While I spend most days “doing” 2.0 type work for my client, I’ve become someone who is always scanning the horizon. But I’m more of an “early adopter” than an innovator in the sense that while I just got a Netbook and Nokia N810 tablet, these can hardly be considered new in the tech world. But they are not anywhere near mainstream, either.

    Thanks for helping me think through the various dimensions and roles I play in edu-marketing social media within the government!

  • I like your breakout, Steve. I can see this turning into a “what’s your social media horoscope sign?” meme.

    I find that as with all things personality-related, I fall into several categories, to differing degrees. I’m probably mostly a Laborer, with a heavy dose of Realist, part Salesman, and part Innovator. While I spend most days “doing” 2.0 type work for my client, I’ve become someone who is always scanning the horizon. But I’m more of an “early adopter” than an innovator in the sense that while I just got a Netbook and Nokia N810 tablet, these can hardly be considered new in the tech world. But they are not anywhere near mainstream, either.

    Thanks for helping me think through the various dimensions and roles I play in edu-marketing social media within the government!

  • I like your breakout, Steve. I can see this turning into a “what’s your social media horoscope sign?” meme.

    I find that as with all things personality-related, I fall into several categories, to differing degrees. I’m probably mostly a Laborer, with a heavy dose of Realist, part Salesman, and part Innovator. While I spend most days “doing” 2.0 type work for my client, I’ve become someone who is always scanning the horizon. But I’m more of an “early adopter” than an innovator in the sense that while I just got a Netbook and Nokia N810 tablet, these can hardly be considered new in the tech world. But they are not anywhere near mainstream, either.

    Thanks for helping me think through the various dimensions and roles I play in edu-marketing social media within the government!

  • Kim Maisel

    I took a change management course that focused on creativity, and one of the books we focused on was Everett Rodgers’s “Diffusion of Innovations,” where he did something similar to what you did, which is to break down the four types of adopters based on their rate of adoption and the characteristics that fall within it. The book is very dry and repetitive, so wouldn’t recommend it to anyone as a beach read, but he says there are four types of adopters: early adopter, early majority, late majority, laggards. Personally, I am somewhere between early and late majority.

    But will definitely use this with my clients, as I start “training” the senior leaders in my Directorate on my Director’s blog.

    Rogers, Everett M. Diffusion of Innovations. 5th ed. New York, NY: Free Press; 2003.

  • Kim Maisel

    I took a change management course that focused on creativity, and one of the books we focused on was Everett Rodgers’s “Diffusion of Innovations,” where he did something similar to what you did, which is to break down the four types of adopters based on their rate of adoption and the characteristics that fall within it. The book is very dry and repetitive, so wouldn’t recommend it to anyone as a beach read, but he says there are four types of adopters: early adopter, early majority, late majority, laggards. Personally, I am somewhere between early and late majority.

    But will definitely use this with my clients, as I start “training” the senior leaders in my Directorate on my Director’s blog.

    Rogers, Everett M. Diffusion of Innovations. 5th ed. New York, NY: Free Press; 2003.

  • Kim Maisel

    I took a change management course that focused on creativity, and one of the books we focused on was Everett Rodgers’s “Diffusion of Innovations,” where he did something similar to what you did, which is to break down the four types of adopters based on their rate of adoption and the characteristics that fall within it. The book is very dry and repetitive, so wouldn’t recommend it to anyone as a beach read, but he says there are four types of adopters: early adopter, early majority, late majority, laggards. Personally, I am somewhere between early and late majority.

    But will definitely use this with my clients, as I start “training” the senior leaders in my Directorate on my Director’s blog.

    Rogers, Everett M. Diffusion of Innovations. 5th ed. New York, NY: Free Press; 2003.

  • Jeremiah Owyang has a great description of various types of adopters as well. See http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2008/06/06/social-media-early-adopters-pioneers-settlers-and-colonists/ His blog post is about social media, but I think it could be applied to other innovations.

    There’s also Marc Prensky’s famous digital native/digital immigrant paradigm, to which various bloggers, podcasters, twitterers, etc., have added terms like digital resident, digital tourist, digital pioneer, digital translator, and — for those who just don’t want to try anything new — digital Amish. 🙂

  • Jeremiah Owyang has a great description of various types of adopters as well. See http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2008/06/06/social-media-early-adopters-pioneers-settlers-and-colonists/ His blog post is about social media, but I think it could be applied to other innovations.

    There’s also Marc Prensky’s famous digital native/digital immigrant paradigm, to which various bloggers, podcasters, twitterers, etc., have added terms like digital resident, digital tourist, digital pioneer, digital translator, and — for those who just don’t want to try anything new — digital Amish. 🙂

  • Jeremiah Owyang has a great description of various types of adopters as well. See http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2008/06/06/social-media-early-adopters-pioneers-settlers-and-colonists/ His blog post is about social media, but I think it could be applied to other innovations.

    There’s also Marc Prensky’s famous digital native/digital immigrant paradigm, to which various bloggers, podcasters, twitterers, etc., have added terms like digital resident, digital tourist, digital pioneer, digital translator, and — for those who just don’t want to try anything new — digital Amish. 🙂

  • GovLoop Members: Be sure to follow the equally interesting comment stream over at http://www.govloop.com/profiles/blogs/whats-your-government-20

    If you’re not already a member, perhaps you should join GovLoop now, just to find out what a Networker is!

  • GovLoop Members: Be sure to follow the equally interesting comment stream over at http://www.govloop.com/profiles/blogs/whats-your-government-20

    If you’re not already a member, perhaps you should join GovLoop now, just to find out what a Networker is!

  • GovLoop Members: Be sure to follow the equally interesting comment stream over at http://www.govloop.com/profiles/blogs/whats-your-government-20

    If you’re not already a member, perhaps you should join GovLoop now, just to find out what a Networker is!

  • Mike – I’m in total agreement with you that the tension that exists between the “opportunist” and the “skeptic” is both healthy and necessary. Each of these personality brings something to the table and takes something away – it’s how they interact with one another that makes the difference.

    And yes, I had some fun writing this post imagining the prototypes for each of these types – some warranted, some not, but fun nonetheless!

  • Mike – I’m in total agreement with you that the tension that exists between the “opportunist” and the “skeptic” is both healthy and necessary. Each of these personality brings something to the table and takes something away – it’s how they interact with one another that makes the difference.

    And yes, I had some fun writing this post imagining the prototypes for each of these types – some warranted, some not, but fun nonetheless!

  • Mike – I’m in total agreement with you that the tension that exists between the “opportunist” and the “skeptic” is both healthy and necessary. Each of these personality brings something to the table and takes something away – it’s how they interact with one another that makes the difference.

    And yes, I had some fun writing this post imagining the prototypes for each of these types – some warranted, some not, but fun nonetheless!

  • These are just broad, overarching stereotypes – I think that most people fall somewhere in between, and a mix of an innovator and a realist is a pretty good place to be!

  • These are just broad, overarching stereotypes – I think that most people fall somewhere in between, and a mix of an innovator and a realist is a pretty good place to be!

  • These are just broad, overarching stereotypes – I think that most people fall somewhere in between, and a mix of an innovator and a realist is a pretty good place to be!

  • You can totally create a new one! I think that the “Evangelist/Cheerleader” and the “Networker” (brought up on the GovLoop posting of this) is a great addition. I like your description of it as well and reserve the right to add it to the post at a later date 🙂

  • You can totally create a new one! I think that the “Evangelist/Cheerleader” and the “Networker” (brought up on the GovLoop posting of this) is a great addition. I like your description of it as well and reserve the right to add it to the post at a later date 🙂

  • You can totally create a new one! I think that the “Evangelist/Cheerleader” and the “Networker” (brought up on the GovLoop posting of this) is a great addition. I like your description of it as well and reserve the right to add it to the post at a later date 🙂

  • You’re welcome to add it to the post. I’d be honored — and I’d feel “published!”

  • You’re welcome to add it to the post. I’d be honored — and I’d feel “published!”

  • You’re welcome to add it to the post. I’d be honored — and I’d feel “published!”

  • Patty Hardee

    Steve–I love this! It’s fun but thought provoking. It’s like Govt 2.0 meets Cosmo quiz. 🙂

  • Patty Hardee

    Steve–I love this! It’s fun but thought provoking. It’s like Govt 2.0 meets Cosmo quiz. 🙂

  • Patty Hardee

    Steve–I love this! It’s fun but thought provoking. It’s like Govt 2.0 meets Cosmo quiz. 🙂

  • Steve,

    A great breakout of what is what when dealing with the various types of possible interactions in Government 2.0. I can see you associate me as an innovator, I really appreciate that. I would also say I have a mix of Realist (because I have been around so long), Edgerider (because I am always learning about the disruptive tech), and a Rockstar (because I have no problem speaking in front of a room or challenging the speaker or blogger to what the point might be).

    On Tuesday, I started a new position (still with Navstar) working for a new customer. Its in the thick of Gov 2.0 and Innovation and I very excited where it will take not only me, but the Gov community. I am in the middle of a draft post now summarizing my first week.

  • Steve,

    A great breakout of what is what when dealing with the various types of possible interactions in Government 2.0. I can see you associate me as an innovator, I really appreciate that. I would also say I have a mix of Realist (because I have been around so long), Edgerider (because I am always learning about the disruptive tech), and a Rockstar (because I have no problem speaking in front of a room or challenging the speaker or blogger to what the point might be).

    On Tuesday, I started a new position (still with Navstar) working for a new customer. Its in the thick of Gov 2.0 and Innovation and I very excited where it will take not only me, but the Gov community. I am in the middle of a draft post now summarizing my first week.

  • Steve,

    A great breakout of what is what when dealing with the various types of possible interactions in Government 2.0. I can see you associate me as an innovator, I really appreciate that. I would also say I have a mix of Realist (because I have been around so long), Edgerider (because I am always learning about the disruptive tech), and a Rockstar (because I have no problem speaking in front of a room or challenging the speaker or blogger to what the point might be).

    On Tuesday, I started a new position (still with Navstar) working for a new customer. Its in the thick of Gov 2.0 and Innovation and I very excited where it will take not only me, but the Gov community. I am in the middle of a draft post now summarizing my first week.

  • Congrats on the new gig Andrea! I’m looking forward to hearing more about it. While I included you in the Innovator section, I agree that you have (as do I) a little of the others in your personality too.

  • Congrats on the new gig Andrea! I’m looking forward to hearing more about it. While I included you in the Innovator section, I agree that you have (as do I) a little of the others in your personality too.

  • Congrats on the new gig Andrea! I’m looking forward to hearing more about it. While I included you in the Innovator section, I agree that you have (as do I) a little of the others in your personality too.

  • “… I’ve been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, a poet, a pawn and a … Webista?” I’ll claim any of these monikers, except Skeptic and Bystander. Time is short, not just for me, but for the window of opportunity to make this thing take root in fertile soil, while we have the bully pulpit. Sorry about all the mixed metaphors – it’s late here and I’m 60. 😉

  • “… I’ve been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, a poet, a pawn and a … Webista?” I’ll claim any of these monikers, except Skeptic and Bystander. Time is short, not just for me, but for the window of opportunity to make this thing take root in fertile soil, while we have the bully pulpit. Sorry about all the mixed metaphors – it’s late here and I’m 60. 😉

  • “… I’ve been a puppet, a pauper, a pirate, a poet, a pawn and a … Webista?” I’ll claim any of these monikers, except Skeptic and Bystander. Time is short, not just for me, but for the window of opportunity to make this thing take root in fertile soil, while we have the bully pulpit. Sorry about all the mixed metaphors – it’s late here and I’m 60. 😉

  • Fun post! I’d add “Ambassador,” which is how i see myself:
    You’re a rockstar at the core, but you lead by talking to everyone, not claiming ownership. One minute sees you talking code with a techie and the next has you explaining why all of this matters to a skeptic, while your inbox contains a long exchange with a realist and an innovator about how to get your edgrider friend to slow down long enough to give the laborer time to put something in place.

  • Fun post! I’d add “Ambassador,” which is how i see myself:
    You’re a rockstar at the core, but you lead by talking to everyone, not claiming ownership. One minute sees you talking code with a techie and the next has you explaining why all of this matters to a skeptic, while your inbox contains a long exchange with a realist and an innovator about how to get your edgrider friend to slow down long enough to give the laborer time to put something in place.

  • Fun post! I’d add “Ambassador,” which is how i see myself:
    You’re a rockstar at the core, but you lead by talking to everyone, not claiming ownership. One minute sees you talking code with a techie and the next has you explaining why all of this matters to a skeptic, while your inbox contains a long exchange with a realist and an innovator about how to get your edgrider friend to slow down long enough to give the laborer time to put something in place.

  • I think that describes you pretty well!

    “Ambassadors” might be that catch-all type that encompasses a little of all the types above – kind of the well-rounded #gov20 type who fits in with all crowds. I’ll be updating this post with some of the great ideas that I’ve received here in the comments as well as those that I received over on GovLoop.

  • I think that describes you pretty well!

    “Ambassadors” might be that catch-all type that encompasses a little of all the types above – kind of the well-rounded #gov20 type who fits in with all crowds. I’ll be updating this post with some of the great ideas that I’ve received here in the comments as well as those that I received over on GovLoop.